The plants in Dhaka are also in great danger

As pollution is increasing in Dhaka city, it is also decreasing to protect green plants. Scientists have now heard of a new danger for the green that has survived. They say the level of pollution of the damaging gas and micro-objects of the vehicles is so high that the plants of Dhaka city are losing their ability to survive. As long as the green is sustainable, it is feared that it will survive in the pollution.

Plants on the roadside of Dhaka City are most at risk due to pollution. The sustainability of these plants has been reduced by 5 percent above normal levels. This information came out in a joint study of the Department of Chemistry and Botany, University of Dhaka.

Plants on the roadside of Dhaka City are most at risk due to pollution. Photo: Abdus Salam The roadside trees in Dhaka city are most in danger due to pollution. Photo: Abdus Salam
As pollution is increasing in Dhaka city, it is also decreasing to protect green plants. Scientists have now heard of a new danger for the green that has survived. They say the level of pollution of the damaging gas and micro-objects of the vehicles is so high that the plants of Dhaka city are losing their ability to survive. As long as the green is sustainable, it is feared that it will survive in the pollution.

Plants on the roadside of Dhaka City are most at risk due to pollution. The sustainability of these plants has been reduced by 5 percent above normal levels. This information came out in a joint study of the Department of Chemistry and Botany, University of Dhaka.
The research article was published in the international publication Springer Nature Applied Sciences Journal on October 12. Researchers say that this is the first country in the country to study the sensitivity of trees. Research has been done to determine the extent to which the susceptibility of Dhaka city plants to pollution is being wasted.

Studies have shown that the city’s cedar, mahogany and jackfruit are having a detrimental effect on vehicles emitting nitrogen dioxide gas and microorganisms (PM2.5).

Researchers say that the leaf surfaces absorb pollutants, including airborne matter, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide and carbon dioxide. Plants have a major role in absorbing these elements. In addition to absorbing the carbon dioxide in the air, water from the soil in the presence of sunlight and chlorophyll, the plant produces food and releases oxygen in the process of absorption. Animals survive with this oxygen.

In response to the question of how trees are losing their ability to survive due to pollution, research team member and professor of botany of Dhaka University, Mohammad Jasim Uddin, gave an example, saying that using black umbrella for several days, it suddenly faded. Likewise, the tolerance of plants in pollution also gradually decreases. Increasing the amount of nitrogen dioxide and microorganisms in the air plays a major role in reducing the total chlorophyll of the plant. Without this chlorophyll the tree cannot make food. Again, the process of opening and closing the leaf canopy also makes it a trivial matter. This reduces the rate of cellulose synthesis. Disruption of the growth and yield of trees. Sulfur dioxide again combines with water to produce sulfuric acid, which can remove magnesium, the main constituent of chlorophyll. As a result, the leaves begin to fade. The size, shape, and shape of the leaves of the tree also change. The flower-fruit capacity is gradually damaged. At one point the tree dies. But these are not a matter of two days, but the result of long term pollution.

According to data from The State of Global Air-20, Global Air Pollution Risks Report, Bangladesh has died of 260,000 people in 26 years due to air pollution. The report, published in a joint venture between the United States Institute of Health Matrix and Evaluation and the Institute of Health Effects, was published on April 7 of this year. According to the report, Bangladesh is fifth in the number of air pollution deaths. And according to the ‘World Airplane Report 20’ by AirVisual, a US-based air observer on March 7, Dhaka is ranked second in the list of the most polluted capital cities in the world. The volume of small objects in the air in Dhaka City is almost three times higher than the levels provided by the World Health Organization (WHO).

Plants are less able to survive pollution

The research team of the University of Dhaka collects mature leaves of cedar, mahogany and jackfruit from the three types of areas of Dhaka city in summer (March-May), monsoon (June-September) and winter (November-February) of the year 23-5. Areas include the busy roads of Farmgate and Gulshan, residential areas of Uttara and Dhanmondi, and the Botanical Gardens.

Depending on the air pollution tolerance index (APTI), how sensitive the plant is to pollution. Plant susceptibility is at risk if APTI is less than or equal to 12. That is, the tolerance of such plants is reduced in pollution. Researchers have found that the APTI of trees in summer and monsoon is 9.5% and 5.7% respectively. That is, the plant’s ability to survive in pollution is somewhat less during these two seasons. However, in winter it decreases even more (1 decimal 5). Researchers found the roadside tree to be less vulnerable to vehicular pollution than residential and controlled land (botanical gardens).

Assistant planner and member of the research team, Mustafizur Rahman, assistant planner and researcher at Hokkaido University, said in the first light, the green area of ​​Dhaka was 12 percent of the total area. In 20, it dropped to 5 percent. At present, the green area in the city will not be more than 3-5 percent.

Reservoirs also play a major role in controlling pollution. However, due to unplanned urbanization, water is filled with reservoirs, lowlands, canals and rivers. According to data from the Bangladesh Institute of Planners, 22 percent of the wetland designated in Dhaka’s Detailed Territory Planning (DAP) has been filled up by January 28. And according to the Environment Department report published in March this year, the city’s brick kiln still accounts for 5 percent of Dhaka’s pollution. Road and soil dust and automobile pollution account for about 20 percent.

Syeda Rizwana Hassan, chief executive of the Bangladesh Environmental Legal Association (BALA), told First Light that most of the big cities, including Dhaka, have been degraded in the name of development. As much as there are plants, if they lose their ability to survive, it will be difficult to live in this city. To overcome this situation, he advised local government institutions to be responsible for planting large-scale trees throughout the city. Otherwise, no tree or people will survive in Dhaka city.

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